Presenting episode 5 of “In Production:DaVinci Resolve”!

In this episode:

Carey and Steve discuss why you might want to use a control surface, and the options in controllers that are out there. We’ll also discuss monitoring very pragmatically, and offer some straight talk on the number one job of your monitor. It’s probably not what you think!

BONUS: Check out the video embedded below on “Metamerism Failure”. A scientific explanation of why monitors can be accurately calibrated and still not match each other!

Episode 5 of 6: Controllers and Monitors


About the show:
“In Production” is a brand new video chat program where hosts Carey Dissmore and Steve Oakley discuss tools and topics related to the video production business from their unique perspective as independent production business owner/operators.

This series on DaVinci Resolve will be released in 6 episodes.

The final episode will be released right here on CareyDissmore.com and also on SteveOakley.net

BONUS: Explaining Metamerism Failure

Flanders Scientific, makers of very high quality reference monitors has released this video… an excellent explanation of metamerism failure. The best, most accurate explanation I’ve ever seen as to why different monitor types can measure as calibrated accurately and still look different to your eyes when compared SIDE-BY-SIDE. This is an excellent counterpoint that illustrates why it might not be the best idea for me to be running my LCD, CRT and plasma monitors all at once in my edit/grading suite.

I strongly urge you to watch this video. Then watch it again. It’s dropping serious knowledge that will help you understand human vision, display technology and generally be a better video pro.

You can pre-order the Canon 5D Mark III from Amazon here, and probably get it as fast or faster than anywhere else. Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera (Body)

Canon USA has announced the 5D Mark III, the successor to the camera that can be credited with starting the DSLR revolution. This camera has been hotly anticipated and many thought it would be released around the 3 year timeframe last fall. (The 5D Mark II was introduced in Fall 2008).

Looking over the specs, this is a pretty nice upgrade, but due to the rabid fan base who hoped for more than this unit delivers, there will no doubt be some disappointment that it doesn’t contain certain anticipated features. The one that catches my attention is the lack of a clean HDMI output (at this time), which some, myself included, would like to use with higher quality external recorders. Now it should be noted that external recorder workflow certainly would add bulk to the camera so for the most extreme run-n-gun scenarios it’s not always suitable, but still, the option would be nice! Maybe with a firmware update?

It remains to be seen what they’ve done to improve moiré, but I think they’ll do it via more advanced electronic processing on the Digic 5+ CPU vs. engineering an optical-low-pass filter tuned for 1080p video in front of the sensor which would need to be moved out of the way when shooting high rez stills. Nevertheless this seems like a pretty nice bump in the overall performance of the camera. I look forward to getting my hands on one, and checking out some of the online reviews and comparisons. I wanna see some moiré torture tests! Cobblestone streets maybe?

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., March 2, 2012 – On the 25th anniversary of its world-renowned EOS System, Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is proud to announce its latest model, the new EOS 5D Mark III Digital SLR Camera. Positioned between the extremely popular EOS 5D Mark II and Canon’s top-of-the-line professional EOS-1D X model, the EOS 5D Mark III delivers superb image quality, thanks to a new 22.3-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS sensor, a high-performance DIGIC 5+ Imaging Processor, a 61-point High Density Reticular Autofocus (AF) System and six frames-per-second (fps) continuous shooting speed. Building upon the trailblazing success of the EOS 5D Mark II, the EOS 5D Mark III also incorporates enhanced video features for professionals in the fields of cinematography, television production and documentary filmmaking, including better noise reduction, longer recording times and a built-in headphone jack for audio monitoring. The EOS 5D Mark III is Canon’s answer to hundreds of thousands of advanced amateurs and emerging professionals looking for a compact, high-quality camera system to help them achieve their artistic vision, whether it be through still or video imagery. The EOS 5D Mark III introduction coincides with Canon’s 25th anniversary celebration of the EOS camera system. Canon’s award-winning EOS system first debuted in March of 1987 with the introduction of the EOS 650 SLR camera and three EF lenses.

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EOS 5D Mark III Video: The Legacy Continues

The EOS 5D Mark II blazed the trail for EOS cameras and Canon to enter the professional video and cinema markets, paving the way for Canon’s recent introduction of the Cinema EOS system of cameras and lenses. Now, the EOS 5D Mark III continues Canon’s commitment to these new markets with new and requested features from cinematographers, television production professionals and independent filmmakers. This new model captures 1080p Full HD video at 24p (23.976), 25p, and 30p (29.97) fps; 720p HD recording at 60 (59.94) and 50 fps; and SD recording at 30 (29.97) and 25 fps, giving cinematographers and videographers more flexibility and options for video capture.

The EOS 5D Mark III includes new H.264 video compression formats to simplify and speed up post-production work: intraframe (ALL-I) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data storage efficiency, giving professionals options to help achieve their ideal workflow. Like the EOS-1D X, the 5D Mark III also includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing video footage from multiple cameras and separate audio recordings to be synced together in post production.

The new full-frame CMOS sensor and DIGIC 5+ processor have enhanced the camera’s image processing performance over the 5D Mark II, significantly reducing moir‚ and color artifacts in scenes with horizontal lines. The video footage produced will exhibit less moir‚ than seen in previous DSLR models, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. Accommodating documentary filmmakers, and event videographers using EOS DSLR cameras, the 5D Mark III includes the ability to record video continuously up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files. Long-form filmmakers will enjoy the camera’s automatic file splitting in combination with the extended memory capacity offered by dual card slots.

The Canon EOS 5D Mark III also includes manual audio level control with 64 levels, adjustable both before and during movie recording. There is also an automatic audio level setting, or sound recording can be turned off entirely. A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input. Notably, the EOS 5D Mark III is the first EOS Digital SLR to feature a built-in headphone jack for real-time audio monitoring during video capture.

The full Canon press release can be found here.

Pre order: Canon EOS 5D Mark III 22.3 MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera (Body)

Presenting episode 4 of “In Production: DaVinci Resolve” !

In this episode:
Carey and Steve get into setting up a Resolve system and what machines will run it. We talk about GPU acceleration, CUDA vs. OpenCL, Red Rocket, laptops, iMacs, and Resolve Lite-the FREE version.

Missed the first three episodes? They’re all here.

Episode 4 of 6: Setting Up A Resolve System


Direct YouTube Link

About the show:
“In Production” is a brand new video chat program where hosts Carey Dissmore and Steve Oakley discuss tools and topics related to the video production business from their unique perspective as independent production business owner/operators.

This series on DaVinci Resolve will be released in 6 episodes.

Additional episodes will be released weekly right here on CareyDissmore.com and also on SteveOakley.net

Presenting episode 3 of “In Production: DaVinci Resolve” !

In this episode:
Carey and Steve talk get into an overview of the Resolve workflow. We’ll explore a number of different ways to get projects in and out of Resolve, some great features AND gotchas, and express an opinion or two along the way.

Missed the first two episodes? They’re right here.

Episode 3 of 6: Resolve Workflow Overview

Direct YouTube Link

About the show:
“In Production” is a brand new video chat program where hosts Carey Dissmore and Steve Oakley discuss tools and topics related to the video production business from their unique perspective as independent production business owner/operators.

This series on DaVinci Resolve will be released in 6 episodes.

Additional episodes will be released weekly right here on CareyDissmore.com and also on SteveOakley.net

I’m very happy to present a brand new blog show.

In Production” is a brand new video chat program where hosts Carey Dissmore (that’s me) and Steve Oakley discuss tools and topics related to the video production business from their unique perspective as independent production business owner/operators.

This show will be produced periodically as series around specific topics. Our first series is on the topic of Color Grading and DaVinci Resolve. This series is comprised of 6 episodes, to be released weekly. The first two episodes are embedded below.

We hope you like this show and, as always, welcome your comments. Cheers.

Episode 1 of 6: Introduction

Direct YouTube link

Episode 2 of 6: Color Grading Basics

Direct YouTube link

Additional episodes will be released weekly right here on CareyDissmore.com and also on SteveOakley.net

Looks like Adobe has essentially reinstated their switcher promo for a brief period of time (less than 3 weeks).

The skinny:
Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium – Regularly $1699, now $849 (boxed version) through March 2, 2012.

Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 Regularly $799, now $399 (boxed version) through March 2, 2012.

You can get the details and purchase at Toolfarm.

Go Get Em!

Link to downloads page.

Blackmagic Design today released Desktop Video 9.2 beta 1, a software update for its capture and playback products that adds broadcast monitoring support with the new Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3 update.

Desktop Video 9.2 beta 1 for Mac OS X is available for download now and is free of charge for all Blackmagic Design customers. This update includes support for all current DeckLink, Multibridge, Intensity and UltraStudio models.

Broadcast monitoring in Final Cut Pro 10.0.3 allows video output to external monitors and other equipment using the SDI, HDMI or analog video outputs from Blackmagic Design video hardware.

Desktop Video 9.2 beta 1 includes a new control panel for selecting the video output format from Final Cut Pro X for output to devices such as broadcast quality monitors, HDTVs and projectors, so you can see exactly what your master will look like in television colorspace.

 

Apple has announced immediate availability of Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3 with some really big new features like Multicam, improved XML, Relinking…and Broadcast monitoring!

In this short post I discuss some of these new announcements as well as an exciting new tool from Intelligent Assistance, 7 to X, which provides a way to move your legacy Final Cut Pro 7 projects to FCP X.

I also include an addendum on my previous posts about Thunderbolt and the Mac Pro future.

Apple’s official page announcing the FCP 10.0.3 Software Update

Philip Hodgetts Blog post about the creation of 7toX, the FCP 7 to FCP X translation utility.

Hey gang,

This is some very exciting news for the world of production that does not work in full-blown uncompressed video very often.

Blackmagic Design has had one of the most affordable SDI/HDMI recording devices available in the Hyperdeck Shuttle, which takes off-the-shelf SSDs as recording media, and costs just $345. But it had one rub that quickly harmed it’s appeal: It would only record full-rate uncompressed video which meant record times of just 9 minutes or so on a 64GB SSD. The high cost of SSDs (now dropping a bit) combined with the sheer volume of data to transfer and manage through the entire editorial and archive process made this product less desirable for many longer-form projects.

Today Blackmagic has announced that the Hyperdeck Shuttle 2 will now have the option of recording in DNxHD, writing files in industry standard MXF format. DNxHD is a codec with similar performance to Apple ProRes, but is developed and championed by Avid (Although you can work with these files in Premiere Pro). This will dramatically improve recording times (5x or more) and have the added benefit of making total project sizes far more manageable…all without reducing visual quality in a perceptible way.

 

Blackmagic Design Releases HyperDeck Shuttle 2 with Avid DNxHD Recording and Playback

Milpitas, USA – January 19, 2012 – Blackmagic Design today released a new version of it’s popular HyperDeck Shuttle Solid State Disk recorder. HyperDeck Shuttle 2 replaces the existing model and adds broadcast quality 10-bit recording and playback to the Avid DNxHD format for the same low price of $345.

You can find the rest of the press release by clicking here.

Please note that in a show of solidarity with the greater internet community, this site will be joining literally thousands of others in a blackout from 8AM to 8PM Eastern US time to protest pending SOPA/PIPA legislation in the U.S. Congress.

This is very dangerous legislation that literally threatens the very functioning of the internet, even with DNS blocking provisions removed.

For some insight to the blackout from Wikipedia, click here.